People Of Color: An Exclusionary Term

The term “people of color“ exists to distill diversity in favor of excluding one specific group.

The term “people of color” has gained quite a bit of popularity among the intersectional groups on the left. Now, for those of you who have studied history at any level, it should immediately strike you how similar it sounds to the old racist term “colored people”.

This term comes on the heels of a well-known group, black lives matter, pushing racial tension and even going so far as to get some colleges to segregate their dorms based on race. It’s OK to advertise events that say “no white people allowed”. It’s even OK to be deeply racist, and have it documented over the course of five years, and still get hired by the New York Times. It’s OK because it’s against white people.

See, there is a common thread these days: white people are the devil, and everybody needs to fight against it. The term people of color works to simplify that. The term doesn’t just encompass black people. “People of color” can mean black, Mexican, Asian, Indian, Native American, or Polynesian. It means anything but white. It is not an inclusive term, it is a specifically exclusive term. It allows the people of earth to combine into two teams: White, and not White.

That’s the point. That is the whole point of that term existing.

Here’s the rub: have you ever met and spent a lot of time with a Ugandan, a Kenyan, and a Jamaican? I have. The word black doesn’t even encompass those three people. There is a world of difference between those three cultures, and to boil them down to the word black would be an insult. To further boil them down to “people of color” would be far worse. To the intersectionals, though, the Ugandan and the Jamaican are exactly the same as the Chinese and the Mexican, because they are not the white devil.

On that note, you would be hard-pressed to find a Pakistani who is the same as an Iranian. Find a person from Sweden who is the same as a person from Arizona. Here’s one for you; find an Inuit who is the same as an Apache.

It is an insult to all of these people’s diverse cultures to boil them down into any sort of general language.

The sanitization and changing and generalizing of language is always used to control. They say that it is used to be inclusive, or to spare certain people’s feelings, but when it really comes down to it, it is about control.

Do not be controlled. Do not be divided. Beyond that, don’t even begin to suggest that someone from Kenya is the same thing as a Native American, other than being human.

2 thoughts on “People Of Color: An Exclusionary Term

  1. Why don’t we all just ditch the categorial terms and just call people “people”. You know, if we all strive for a united world, we have to start with ourselves. Let’s start referring to men and women without the need to call them “of color,” “white,” “brown,” “black,” etc.

    Liked by 1 person

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