Perpetual Adolescence

Something strange to notice these days, is how much time young adults spend trying to remain in their adolescence. A record number of young adults or choosing to remain living at home with their parents, or living with roommates into their thirties. While some of these people have good jobs and contribute at home; not their home, but their parents home, many of them eke out an existence working at a Starbucks or similar coffee shop, or in a music store. They tend to have useless degrees as well, such as sociology, associates level psychology, or the dreaded gender studies. These are expensive courses that put people in terrible that while not preparing them financially to pay that debt back.

These are the people you see protesting all the time. They join groups like Antifa and travel around the country, unwashed and angry. They’ve got the time for it, because they’re not working an actual job. They tend to be very aggressive toward those that promote the STEM fields in school, and try to surround themselves with people much younger than them, more impressionable. 

Psychologist and cultural critic Jordan Peterson calls this a Peter Pan existence. This title makes sense. Peter didn’t want to grow up, and despised anyone who did. Captain Hook was the specter of adulthood, with the crocodile constantly chasing him, ticking, ticking, constantly ticking. A literal form of mortality. Time had already gotten a taste for him, and wanted the remainder.

Isn’t that just how it is though? We spend every day heading toward the end, inevitable and inexorable. We don’t get a choice in it, and yet, among the generation known as millennials, there is an idea that you can remain young until you suddenly wither and die. 

These are people for whom, when they reach their thirties and finally have to open themselves up to reality, things are going to be much harder because of the years they have wasted thinking that they are the ones that know better. These are people who are going to be bitter, angry, frustrated that their reward for trying to change the course of the country will be laboring until their final day.

Those of you who are reading this and have escaped that fate, good for you. Those of you who are reading this, however, and are still paying money into a course that’s only going to teach you how to divide people up into groups, get out before it’s too late. You deserve better, and so do the people around you.

There’s nothing that says personal responsibility better than piloting your life in a direction that’s not going to hurt yourself or those around you.

Two Kinds of People

A tale of two mindsets.

It’s a beautiful sunny day. Big, fluffy white clouds are in the bright blue sky, it’s a comfortable 85 out, and two friends meander down the sidewalk, sharing a laugh about something in their conversation. A beautiful vehicle drives by, and they both stop to silently admire it.

One says, to the air in front of them, “What a beautiful car. One day I’m gonna buy one of those. I’ll work my butt off till I get it.”

The other says, “What a beautiful car. Why should that guy get it and not me? Is he better than me? I deserve that car!”

This duality of viewpoints is common all over this great country of ours. It is easily found on the news, in TV shows, and in politics. You, the reader, and your best friend may even have this duality between you.

While it is great to have differing views in this world, in this case, the one borne on pettiness and jealousy is terribly wasteful. Sadly, this is the one that appears to be gaining ground in our modern age. In 2017, people are inundated with instant gratification. Those who play the long game are becoming fewer, and quieter, while the latter are becoming more vocal and gaining platforms with which to spout their detrimental views to like-minded masses.

This blog is an attempt to bring together those people who value personal responsibility. Each day we will cover something to add to the growing conversation of personal responsibility, providence, and presiding over our flocks with mindfulness.

Until next time, keep honing your life.